Strategic Plan

Vision  

Jefferson Parish Human Services Authority (JPHSA) envisions a Jefferson Parish in which individuals and families will live full, healthy, independent and productive lives to the greatest extent possible with available resources.

 

 Mission

Individuals and families in Jefferson Parish affected by Mental Illness, Addictive Disorders or Developmental Disabilities shall live full, independent and productive lives to the greatest extent possible for available resources, including the integration of primary care into clinical services.

 

Philosophy  

Jefferson Parish Human Services Authority has embraced shared philosophies of person-centered, holistic, and recovery-oriented service planning and delivery within a culture committed: 

  • To assist each individual served with overcoming barriers to achieving his or her full potential;
  • To offer relevant and integrated services representative of best and evidence-based practices with a focus on positive outcomes;
  • To maintain service delivery environments that are both welcoming and safe; and,
  • To practice the Authority’s Service Statement – we promise courtesy, empathy, and respect in meeting the expectations of those we serve and each other – during daily interpersonal interactions.

Jefferson Parish Human Services Authority operates within a context of performance and continuous quality improvement and practices data-based decision-making to assure effective and efficient use of available resources and to best position the Authority for long-term sustainability.

 

Executive Summary

In 1989, the Louisiana State Legislature passed RS 28:831, the enabling legislation that established Jefferson Parish Human Services Authority as a Local Governing Entity responsible for the administration, management and operation of mental health, addictive disorders, and developmental disabilities services for the residents of Jefferson Parish, Louisiana.

Governance of JPHSA is by a 12-member Board of Directors with nine members appointed by the Jefferson Parish Council and the remaining three members appointed by the Governor of Louisiana. Each Board member must possess experience in the area of mental health, addictive disorders, or developmental disabilities and represent parents, consumers, advocacy groups, or serve as a professional in one of the areas. All members serve without compensation.

The Board operates under a policy governance model with an ends statement, i.e. mission and means limitations policies in place for an Executive Director to follow. The Board governs with an emphasis on: outward vision rather than an internal preoccupation; encouragement of diversity in viewpoints; strategic leadership more than administrative detail; clear distinction between Board and Chief Executive roles; collective rather than individual decisions; future rather than past or present; and, actively rather than reactively. During Fiscal Year 2012-2013, the Board amended the Authority’s Mission Statement to include integration of primary care into clinical services as a directive to utilize a holistic approach in supporting the overall health of the Jefferson Parish community.

The JPHSA Executive Director, selected by the Board, is supported in administration and day-to-day operations by an Executive Management Team. This leadership strives to foster a culture of accountability and collaboration in an environment focused on evidence-based and best practices, ongoing assessment of needs, and continuous performance and quality improvement. Success is defined by positive outcomes and customer satisfaction along with maximized efficiency and cost-effectiveness in the provision of services and supports.

 As mandated by the Board of Directors, JPHSA allocates its resources according to the following priorities:

  • First Priority.  Persons and families in crisis related to mental illness, addictive disorders or developmental disabilities shall have their crisis resolved and a safe environment restored.
  • Second Priority.  Persons with serious and disabling mental illness, addictive disorders or developmental disabilities shall make use of natural supports and community resources and shall participate in the community.
  • Third Priority.  Persons with mild to moderate needs related to mental illness, addictive disorders or developmental disabilities shall make use of natural supports and community resources and shall participate in the community.
  • Fourth Priority.  Persons not yet identified with specific serious or moderate mental illness, addictive disorders, or developmental disabilities, but who are at significant risk of such disorders due to the presence of empirically established risk factors or the absence of the empirically protective factors do not develop the problems for which they are at risk.

 

Strategic Links 

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

“Recovery is defined as a process of change through which individuals improve their health and wellness, live a self directed life and strive to reach their full potential.”  Major dimensions of recovery are defined as health, home, purpose and community.

Health: overcoming or managing one’s diseases as well as living in a physically and emotionally way.

Home:  a stable and safe place to live.

Purpose: meaningful daily activities, such as a job, school, volunteerism, family caretaking or creative endeavors and the independence, income and resources to participate in society.

Community:  relationships and social networks that support friendship, love and hope.

 

Healthy People 2020

Objective MHMD HP 2020-6: Increase the proportion of children with mental problems who receive treatment.

Objective MHMD HP 2020-12: Increase the proportion of persons with serious mental illness who are employed.

Objective MHMD HP 2020-13: Increase the proportion of adults with mental disorder who receive treatment.

 

Institute of Medicine Report

Goal 1: Assuring the system is patient centered.

Goal 2: Enhancing measurement and quality improvements in infrastructure.

Goal 3: Improving linkages across the systems of care.

Goal 4: Increasing involvement in National Health Information Infrastructure.

 

National Alliance for the Mentally Ill (NAMI)

“75% of the most frequent users of health and criminal justice services were diagnosed with a mental illness or substance abuse problem.”

“Lack of housing causes people with severe mental illness to cycle among hospitals, shelters or jails at very high costs.”

“Investments in supportive housing and mental health services also save money: a New York study of 10,000 people with mental illness showed that after supportive housing and services, there was a 60% drop in state hospital use and an 80% drop in the number of public hospital in-patient days.”

 

Parish Children and Youth Services Planning Boards Act (Act 555)

For the purposes of encouraging positive youth development, diversion of youth from the criminal justice system, reduction in commitments of youth to state institutions, promoting efficiency and economy in the delivery of youth services, and providing community response to the growing rate of juvenile delinquency, the legislature authorizes a program of state subsidies to assist parishes, on a voluntary basis, in the development, implementation, and operation of comprehensive, community-based youth service programs.

 

The purpose of the children and youth planning boards is to assist in the assessment, alignment, coordination, prioritization, and measurement of all available services and programs that address the needs of children and youth. This includes children and youth at risk for, or identified with, social, emotional, or developmental problems, including, but not limited to educational failure, abuse, neglect, exposure to violence, juvenile or parental mental illness, juvenile or parental substance abuse, poverty, developmental disabilities and delinquency. The boards are intended to encourage collaborative efforts among local stakeholders for assessing the physical, social, behavioral, and educational needs of children and youth in their respective communities and for assisting in the development of comprehensive plans to address such needs.

 

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

Assertive Community Treatment has been endorsed as an essential treatment for severe mental illness in the Surgeon General’s Report on Mental Health.

In the new federal performance indicators system developed by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, accessibility to Assertive Community Treatment services is one of the three best practice measures of the quality of a state’s mental health system. 

 

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s Center for Substance Abuse Prevention (CSAP)

CSAP promotes the use of data-driven decision-making in determining which evidence-based programs, practices, and policies work best to keep citizens healthy. The goal of the CSAP initiative is to create prevention prepared communities where individuals, families, schools, workplaces, and communities take action to promote emotional health and prevent and reduce mental illness, substance abuse including tobacco, and suicide across the lifespan.

 

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT)

CSAT promotes the quality and availability of community-based substance abuse treatment services to improve lives of individuals and families affected by alcohol and drug abuse by ensuring access to clinically sound, cost-effective addiction treatment. Because no single treatment approach is effective for all persons, CSAT supports the effort to provide multiple treatment modalities, to evaluate effectiveness, and to use evaluation results to enhance treatment and recovery approaches.

 

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)

Understanding Health Reform: Integrated Care and Why You Should Care 

“Studies conducted in the last decade show that people with mental health and/or addiction disorders die at a younger age than those in the general population. Causes of these premature deaths are likely to include treatable health conditions such as heart disease and diabetes.”

“Integration of primary care and behavioral health care will allow health professionals to coordinate diagnoses and treatments so that they can complement each other. Integrated care should result in fewer medical tests and eliminate repetition of even such simple procedures as blood draws.”

“An important result of integrated health care delivery for everyone will be the ability for all health care information to be accessible from one place.”

 

National Council for Community Behavioral Healthcare                      

Background Paper: Behavioral Health/Primary Care Integration Models, Competencies, and Infrastructure, May 2003

Why Pursue Integration?

  • Because it is the right thing to do.
  • Because many people in the broader community now receive their behavioral healthcare in a primary care setting, and the gap between the medical and behavioral healthcare systems must be bridged.
  • Because there is the opportunity for quality improvement of care within the primary care and specialty behavioral healthcare settings.
  • Because many people being served by public behavioral health services need better access to primary care.
  • Because community health centers serve people who need better access to behavioral healthcare.
  • Because behavioral health clinicians are a resource for assisting people with all types of chronic health conditions.
  • Because there are changes underway in the financing of both healthcare and behavioral healthcare systems.

 

American Academy of Pediatrics Mental Health Initiatives

“The need for primary care clinicians to manage children with mental health concerns only will continue to increase in the future…Primary care clinicians are, and will continue to be, an important first resource for parents who are worried about their child’s behavioral problems.”

 

American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AAIDD)

People with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities must be able to live the lives they choose and have a good quality of life.

 

A good quality of life exists for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities when they:

  • Receive the support, encouragement, opportunity and resources to explore and define how they want to live their lives;
  • Choose and receive the services and supports that will help them live meaningful lives;
  • Direct the services and supports they receive;
  • Lead a life rich with friendships;
  • Have their rights, dignity and privacy protected;
  • Are allowed to take risks in their choices; and,
  • Are assured of health and safety.

 

Public agencies, private organizations, and individuals providing services and supports must:

  • Be responsible and accountable to individuals and their families;
  • Continuously improve their efforts to support individuals in leading meaningful lives;
  • Be recognized when they make meaningful contributions to the quality of life for individuals;
  • Be replaced when they fail to make meaningful contributions to quality of life for individuals; and,
  • Be part of a program of ongoing monitoring, independent of the service provider, to ensure desired outcomes and the satisfaction of the people served and their families.

 

Developmental Disabilities Council

The Developmental Disabilities Council ensures that all individuals with disabilities benefit from supports and opportunities in their communities so they can achieve quality of live life in conformance with their wishes.

 

Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA)

Ensuring educational and related services to children with disabilities from birth to 21 years of age, IDEA states that disability is a natural part of the human experience and in no way diminishes the right of individuals to participate in or contribute to society. The IDEA makes certain that educational services result in equality of opportunity, full participation, independent living, and economic self-sufficiency for individuals with disabilities.

 

Louisiana Act 378, Family Support Act of 1989

Individuals and families with developmental disabilities need supports and services which are person- and family-centered, flexible, and determined by their preferences, goals and priorities. No matter the severity of the disability or degree of support needed, supports and services must be provided so the individual may live in a stable family environment within the community. Services and supports must be responsive to individuals and families, and result in individuals having greater independence, community participation, and productivity similar to other citizens without disabilities in community domains such as employment, volunteer

service, participation in neighborhood activities, home ownership, and education.

 

Human Resources Policies Benefiting Women and Families, Act 1078

With regard to employees who provide services and to support staff, JPHSA has an array of authority-wide Human Resources policies that support female employees, and hence, their families. All policies are reviewed on a regular basis and updated as needed. Additionally, the Human Resources Director monitors state and federal guidelines/mandates as well as internal feedback from front-line staff and management to assure compliance and to stimulate process improvement.

With regard to individuals served, as reflected in this strategic plan, JPHSA utilizes a person- and family-centered approach to the provision of services and supports; and, recognizes 1) families as the foundation of lifelong love and care; and, 2) the need for families to be supported and strengthened. Evidence, too, the operation of activities within the JPHSA program – Child & Youth Clinic- and Community-based Behavioral Health Services – with focus on children, infancy through adolescence, and the family unit; and, including services specifically geared to benefit women in the parent role.

 

JPHSA has one program: Jefferson Parish Human Services Authority.

The Jefferson Parish Human Services Authority program includes the following activities: Behavioral Health Community-based and Specialty Services; Integrated Primary Care and Behavioral Health Clinic-based Services; Developmental Disabilities Community Services; and, Business Management/ Performance & Quality Improvement Services.   

 

Behavioral Health Community-based and Specialty Services:  provides community-based treatment and support services for adults, children and adolescents with serious mental illness, emotional and behavioral disorders, and/or addictive disorders. Treatment and support services include the development, expansion, and provision of housing, employment, mobile crisis services and in-home treatments and supports, as well as, linkage to additional community resources. Services prevent psychiatric hospitalization, facilitate independence, and maximize individual recovery and resiliency. 

 

Integrated Primary Care and Behavioral Health Clinic-based Services:  provides adults, children, adolescents, and their families with inter- and outer-agency coordinated care through collaborations that aid in the provision of Integrated Primary Care and Behavioral Health services that improve health outcomes, reduce costly and restrictive inpatient or out-of-home placement, and address key health factors such as self-care and reduction of unhealthy behaviors. Clinic-based care for individuals discharged from hospitals is facilitated by care managers; follow-up services are determined by primary care needs and a best practice level of care system for behavioral health needs; and, services are individualized by a multidisciplinary treatment team that includes the adult, child, or adolescent, and the family served.

 

Developmental Disabilities Community Services:  provides a single point of entry for individuals with Developmental Disabilities. Supports and services are person- and family-centered and planned to assist individuals with developmental disabilities to have full participation and inclusion in their community. Developmental Disabilities Community Services encourages full community participation and inclusion by focusing on increasing independence, promoting equal employment, supporting educational goals, assisting with increasing skill development, and decreasing challenging behaviors that my lead to institutionalization or services in a more restrictive setting.

 

Business Management/Performance & Quality Improvement Services:  provides accreditation maintenance; quality management (monitoring, auditing, corrective action and/or improvement activities); utilization review and management (right service at the right time for the right duration with the right provider and record review); decision support (data collection, mining and analysis); outcomes reporting; managed care contracting and credentialing; service billing and denial management; contract and grants administration; fiscal/accounting services; facilities management; risk prevention and safety inspection; information technology management (network, hardware, and software); human resources management and internal consulting; training; and, benefits management. JPHSA nurtures a culture of service quality, efficiency, and efficacy as well as maximization of resources and capacity. 

 

 

Authority Goals

Goal I 

Provide holistic and integrated services and supports that improve the quality of life and community participation for persons in crisis and/or with serious and persistent mental illness, emotional and behavioral disorders, addictive disorders, and/or developmental disabilities, while providing appropriate and best practices to individuals with less severe needs.

 

Goal II

Improve personal outcomes through effective implementation of best practices and data-driven decision-making.

 

Objective I:    

Through Behavioral Health Community-based and Specialty Services, decrease the disabling effects of mental illness and/or addictive disorders to enable adults ages 21 and older who are receiving services to live successfully in the community by the end of FY 2018-2019.

 

Strategies:

1.1   Monitor community-based providers to insure adherence to best practices.

1.2   Provide intensive technical assistance to maximize community-based provider effectiveness and facilitate linkages to available resources.

1.3   Insure community-based providers implement Performance & Quality Improvement (PQI) plans.

 

Performance Indicators:

  • Percent of adults receiving community-based services who remain in the community without a hospitalization. (Key)
  • Percent of adults receiving community-based services who remain in stable housing. (Key)

 

 

Objective II:

Through Behavioral Health Community-based and Specialty Services, provide a continuum of best and evidence-based practices to assist children and adolescents under age 21 who are receiving services to live productive lives in the community, increase academic success, and reduce out-of-home placement

and utilization of the juvenile justice system by the end of FY 2018-2019.

 

Strategies:

2.1   Deliver evidence-based and best practice behavioral health community-based services for children and adolescents.

2.2   Measure functional and symptom improvements of children and adolescents who have received services.

2.3   Collaborate with child-serving agencies to enhance availability of resources to serve youth, while decreasing duplication of funding efforts.

 

Performance Indicators:

  • Percent of individuals completing Multi-Systemic Therapy (MST) free from arrests.  (Supportive)
  • Percent of individuals completing Multi-Systemic Therapy (MST) in school or working. (Supportive)
  • Percent of youth who completed Functional Family Therapy (FFT) to show improvement in behavior problems. (Supportive)

 

Objective III:

Through Integrated Primary Care and Behavioral Health Clinic-based Services, increase access to integrated services among adult individuals age 21 and older with serious mental illness and/or addictive disorders and foster recovery and wellness behaviors of goal setting, symptom control, and personal responsibility by the end of FY 2018-2019.

 

Strategies:

3.1   Increase capacity for integrated primary care and behavioral health services.

3.2   Increase use of Care Management as a best practice for primary care, behavioral health care, and integrated care.

3.3   Increase use of treatment modalities shown to be effective in promoting symptom control, goal setting and personal responsibility.

 

Performance Indicators:

  • Number of adults who receive primary care services. (Key)
  • Number of adults who receive behavioral health services. (Key)
  • Number of adults who have documented contact with a care manager. (Key)
  • Percent of adults who report improvement in or maintenance of depressive symptoms. (Key)
  • Percent of adults who report improvement in or maintenance of recovery behaviors of goal setting, knowledge of symptom control, and responsibility for recovery. (Key)

 

Objective IV:

Through Integrated Primary Care and Behavioral Health Clinic-Based Services, provide a continuum of best and evidence-based practices to assist children and adolescents under age 21 to better quality of life by improving emotional well-being, improving family functioning, improving academic success, reducing suspensions and expulsions, reducing out-of-home placement, and reducing involvement with the juvenile justice system by the end of FY 2018-2019.

 

Strategies:

4.1   Deliver evidence-based and best practice clinic-based services for children and adolescents.     

4.2   Measure functional and symptom improvements of children and adolescents who have received services.

 

Performance Indicators:

  • Number of children and adolescents who receive primary care services. (Key)
  • Number of children and adolescents who receive behavioral health services. (Key)
  • Percent of children and adolescents who report improvement in or maintenance of depressive symptoms. (Key)
  • Percent of children and adolescents who report improvement in or maintenance of attention deficit symptoms. (Key)

 

Objective V:

Through Developmental Disabilities Community Services, promote independence, participation, employment and productivity, personal responsibility, and quality of life in the community, thus preventing institutionalization and assuring individuals and families receiving family and support services remain in their communities by the end of FY 2018-2019.

 

Strategies:

5.1   Implement best practices for person/family-centered planning, team functioning and leadership.

5.2   Promote vocational supports or path to employment with transition and working-age adults. 

5.3   Improve the development, implementation and quality of comprehensive plans of support via service monitoring and ongoing plan evaluation.

5.4   Streamline the review of comprehensive plans of support, critical incidents, resource allocations, and other key home and community-based waiver priorities. 

 

Performance Indicators:  

  • Percent of Individual and Family Support recipients who remain in the community vs. institution.  (Key)
  • Percent of persons with a developmental disability employed in community-based employment. (Key)
  • Number of people (unduplicated) receiving state-funded developmental disabilities community-based services. (Key)
  • Percent of available home and community-based waiver slots utilized. (Key)
  • Percent of individuals participating in home and community-based waivers utilizing self-direction. (Key)
  • Percent of individuals with a developmental disability surveyed who reported overall satisfaction with the services they received. (General)

  

Objective VI:

Through the Business Management/Performance & Quality Improvement Services activity, optimize resources through leadership, direction and increased operational efficiency while maintaining the highest level of performance and accountability through FY 2018-2019.

 

Strategies: 

6.1   Increase revenue by decreasing number of days to submit claims for billable clinic-based or community-based services.

6.2   Adhere to JPHSA Staff Development & Supervision Guidelines to promote retention and positive levels of satisfaction among staff.

6.3   Monitor productivity levels among service providers and initiate performance improvement activities as indicated.

6.4   Meet or exceed Council on Accreditation standards and acculturate Performance & Quality Improvement throughout JPHSA.

 

Performance Indicator:

  • Average number of days from date of service to claim submission. (Key)
  • Percent compliance with Performance Evaluation System (PES) evaluations completed within required timeframe. (General)
  • Percent of Behavioral Health Clinic service recipients surveyed who reported they had overall satisfaction with the services they received. (General)
  • Percent of JPHSA Annual Performance & Quality Improvement Initiatives achieved. (General)